STEM AND BRANCH RESPIRATION OF TREES IN ELEVATED CO2 ENVIRONMENTS

Marisa Jenkins
GCEP/ORNL

The primary objective of this research was to monitor the effects of increased [CO2] concentrations on tree respiration. The studies were conducted on the Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) site. A Licor (portable photosynthesis system) was used to monitor the respiration in the tree bole and branches. Increases in CO2 were recorded four times every twenty seconds at each reading. Other factors, such as air temperature, stem temperature and time of day were also monitored. Readings on several different occasions showed the trees in rings one and two (high CO2) were respiring at a higher rate than those in four and five (controlled), and there were no significant differences between the ambient and controlled rings. It also showed respiration rates increased as living tissue increased. This study is only a glimpse of the big picture. It must be considered with similar studies on other tree physiological processes, such as photosynthesis.

Presentation: Stem and Branch Respiration of Trees in Elevated CO2 Environments

 
 

The Global Change Education Program is funded by the
U.S. Department of Energy

Office of Biological and Environmental Research